I May Explode RSS

==
i created the internet

Ask Me A Question

Submit

Archive

Apr
24th
Thu
permalink
Has Manhattan Become Too “Manhattanized”?

There’s a word to describe the worrying phenomenon of cities getting too dense and tall: Manhattanization. But what happens when Manhattan itself becomes too … Manhattanized?
In a city where real estate values are as dizzying as the skyscrapers, the angst over Manhattan’s changing profile and streetscape is becoming louder. The most recent outcry came over the demolition of a five-story building on West 57th Street, former home of Rizzoli Bookstore.
The 2000 edition of the AIA Guide to New York City describes Rizzoli as “a bookshop that feels like a library in a baronial mansion,” and praised its 1985 interior renovation, which preserved many details from its original incarnation as a high-end piano showroom. But after a last-minute review that critics said was cursory and opaque, the Landmarks and Preservation Commission denied protection to its interior or its exterior, and the beloved art and antiquarian book emporium closed its doors on April 11.
Courtesy of Rizzoli.
Developers haven’t disclosed their plans for the site, but this stretch in the core of Midtown Manhattan is already a hive of construction, with one luxury tower after another replacing older buildings, many of which have their own fans.
Some of the skyscrapers under construction soar as high as 75 stories. Apartments with stellar views of Central Park, many selling to foreign investors, can go for as much as $90 million. It’s a transformation that has been hailed by those who want to see the entire neighborhood reinvented, like Nikolai Fedak, who blogs at New York YIMBY (as in, “Yes in my backyard”).
"There won’t be anything left to love if we don’t stop this kind of development."
The change dismays many who believe that a core neighborhood of New York is being gutted of its character (there are also concerns about the shadows some of these mega highrises will cast on Central Park). “There won’t be anything left to love if we don’t stop this kind of development,” State Senator Liz Krueger said during a rally protesting the Rizzoli building’s pending demolition. “It’s a sad day because we’ve already lost this one.”
Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer is one of the New York politicians leading the call for preservation of New York’s historic architecture. Brewer is working on legislation that would make the landmarks review process more consistent, requiring a pre-demolition 30-day review of any building more than 50 years old, with provision for public comment.
"The processes need to be much clearer," says Brewer. "We shouldn’t just lose these buildings without a discussion."
Brewer is a longtime preservationist who has worked to hang onto the infrastructure of a less homogenized New York. As a member of the City Council representing the Upper West Side, she was instrumental in crafting a 2012 zoning change that limited the width of storefronts on the popular neighborhood’s commercial streets, which helped protect the mom-and-pop retailers rapidly being priced out by deep-pocketed banks and chain outlets that wanted to rent the spacious ground floors of the new breed of condo building.
"We cannot be successful as a neighborhood if it’s all banks, and that’s what it’s becoming," Brewer told the New York Times then. “We have to put a halt to it.” Regular storefronts in much of the Upper West Side are now capped at 40 feet in width, while bank branches – which are legion in that upscale part of town – can be no wider than 25 feet.
Brewer acknowledges that her preservationist tendencies have garnered plenty of criticism from those who see her as anti-growth. But she rejects that characterization. A longtime booster of the city’s tech community, Brewer gives the example of East Midtown, where, she acknowledges, “those buildings need an upgrade” to accommodate the workplaces of the present-day – and the future.
Brewer says she knows that change, and destruction of the old, are part of the New York ecosystem. She also acknowledges that Manhattan has its own particular challenges, because of intense development pressure, that are not always shared by other places. But she believes the process of evaluating which buildings are worth preserving needs to be more consistent and more open if the city is going to hold onto the very things that make it such a desirable place to live and work – a lively pedestrian environment, idiosyncratic retail outlets, and small neighborhood businesses.
"There are no easy answers," Brewer says. "But we need a sense of place, a sense of history. I speak for Manhattanites. We don’t want to lose everything."


source:  The Atlantic Cities


Has Manhattan Become Too “Manhattanized”?

There’s a word to describe the worrying phenomenon of cities getting too dense and tall: Manhattanization. But what happens when Manhattan itself becomes too … Manhattanized?

In a city where real estate values are as dizzying as the skyscrapers, the angst over Manhattan’s changing profile and streetscape is becoming louder. The most recent outcry came over the demolition of a five-story building on West 57th Street, former home of Rizzoli Bookstore.

The 2000 edition of the AIA Guide to New York City describes Rizzoli as “a bookshop that feels like a library in a baronial mansion,” and praised its 1985 interior renovation, which preserved many details from its original incarnation as a high-end piano showroom. But after a last-minute review that critics said was cursory and opaque, the Landmarks and Preservation Commission denied protection to its interior or its exterior, and the beloved art and antiquarian book emporium closed its doors on April 11.


Courtesy of Rizzoli.

Developers haven’t disclosed their plans for the site, but this stretch in the core of Midtown Manhattan is already a hive of construction, with one luxury tower after another replacing older buildings, many of which have their own fans.

Some of the skyscrapers under construction soar as high as 75 stories. Apartments with stellar views of Central Park, many selling to foreign investors, can go for as much as $90 million. It’s a transformation that has been hailed by those who want to see the entire neighborhood reinvented, like Nikolai Fedak, who blogs at New York YIMBY (as in, “Yes in my backyard”).

"There won’t be anything left to love if we don’t stop this kind of development."

The change dismays many who believe that a core neighborhood of New York is being gutted of its character (there are also concerns about the shadows some of these mega highrises will cast on Central Park). “There won’t be anything left to love if we don’t stop this kind of development,” State Senator Liz Krueger said during a rally protesting the Rizzoli building’s pending demolition. “It’s a sad day because we’ve already lost this one.”

Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer is one of the New York politicians leading the call for preservation of New York’s historic architecture. Brewer is working on legislation that would make the landmarks review process more consistent, requiring a pre-demolition 30-day review of any building more than 50 years old, with provision for public comment.

"The processes need to be much clearer," says Brewer. "We shouldn’t just lose these buildings without a discussion."

Brewer is a longtime preservationist who has worked to hang onto the infrastructure of a less homogenized New York. As a member of the City Council representing the Upper West Side, she was instrumental in crafting a 2012 zoning change that limited the width of storefronts on the popular neighborhood’s commercial streets, which helped protect the mom-and-pop retailers rapidly being priced out by deep-pocketed banks and chain outlets that wanted to rent the spacious ground floors of the new breed of condo building.

"We cannot be successful as a neighborhood if it’s all banks, and that’s what it’s becoming," Brewer told the New York Times then. “We have to put a halt to it.” Regular storefronts in much of the Upper West Side are now capped at 40 feet in width, while bank branches – which are legion in that upscale part of town – can be no wider than 25 feet.

Brewer acknowledges that her preservationist tendencies have garnered plenty of criticism from those who see her as anti-growth. But she rejects that characterization. A longtime booster of the city’s tech community, Brewer gives the example of East Midtown, where, she acknowledges, “those buildings need an upgrade” to accommodate the workplaces of the present-day – and the future.

Brewer says she knows that change, and destruction of the old, are part of the New York ecosystem. She also acknowledges that Manhattan has its own particular challenges, because of intense development pressure, that are not always shared by other places. But she believes the process of evaluating which buildings are worth preserving needs to be more consistent and more open if the city is going to hold onto the very things that make it such a desirable place to live and work – a lively pedestrian environment, idiosyncratic retail outlets, and small neighborhood businesses.

"There are no easy answers," Brewer says. "But we need a sense of place, a sense of history. I speak for Manhattanites. We don’t want to lose everything."

source:  The Atlantic Cities

Comments (View)
Apr
20th
Sun
permalink
nycgo:

Grand Central and the Chrysler Building

nycgo:

Grand Central and the Chrysler Building

Comments (View)
Apr
16th
Wed
permalink
Comments (View)
Apr
13th
Sun
permalink
centerforinvestigativereporting:

Police in Los Angeles County recently piloted a new technology known as wide-area surveillance to monitor Compton’s streets from the air. Imagine Google Earth with a rewind button for law enforcement.So why have local residents heard little about this experiment until now?Our new special with KQED gives you a first-hand look at emerging surveillance technologies that are being used to fight crime – and the privacy concerns they raise.
Read the full story and watch the segment here.

centerforinvestigativereporting:

Police in Los Angeles County recently piloted a new technology known as wide-area surveillance to monitor Compton’s streets from the air. Imagine Google Earth with a rewind button for law enforcement.

So why have local residents heard little about this experiment until now?

Our new special with KQED gives you a first-hand look at emerging surveillance technologies that are being used to fight crime – and the privacy concerns they raise.

Read the full story and watch the segment here.

Comments (View)
Apr
3rd
Thu
permalink

(Source: televandalist, via bartybart)

Comments (View)
permalink
natgeofound:

Embracing the fjord, a dusk-dimmed Bergen laps against mountain walls, Norway, 1971Photograph by George F. Mobley, National Geographic

natgeofound:

Embracing the fjord, a dusk-dimmed Bergen laps against mountain walls, Norway, 1971Photograph by George F. Mobley, National Geographic

Comments (View)
Mar
28th
Fri
permalink

photojojo:

Recently, New York City-based photographer Daniel Zvereff acquired some of the last remaining stock of Kodak Aerochrome film. 

Daniel brought the ultra-rare film to the icy arctic, transforming the sea of white into hues of magenta, purple, and blue. 

The Arctic Captured With Rare Kodak Aerochrome

(via npr)

Comments (View)
Mar
15th
Sat
permalink
sfmoma:

Photography #SubmissionFriday:
Katarina Zlatec: The New Sun, Zagreb, March 2014

sfmoma:

Photography #SubmissionFriday:

Katarina Zlatec: The New Sun, Zagreb, March 2014

Comments (View)
permalink

fordlibrarymuseum:

Late Night at the White House

After Italian Prime Minister Andreotti departed at 12:20 a.m. the party warmed up. The Marine Band kept a crowd on the dance floor, with President and Mrs. Ford joining in to do the Hustle.

Some guests provided extra entertainment. Actor Peter Graves of Mission: Impossible fame played the clarinet and poet Rod McKuen and baseball player Johnny Bench both sang. Pearl Bailey once again ended the night on a high note, this time with a medley that included “I’ll Be Seeing You” and “Smoke Gets In Your Eyes” topped off with the Battle Hymn of the Republic.

The Fords didn’t leave the party until at 2:00 a.m.

(via ourpresidents)

Comments (View)
permalink
missambear:

pixel nyc subway

missambear:

pixel nyc subway

(Source: honeypen, via micropolisnyc)

Comments (View)
permalink
studiopgrb:

famous works of art transformed into buildings in this series by Italian architect and illustrator Frederico Babina.

studiopgrb:

famous works of art transformed into buildings in this series by Italian architect and illustrator Frederico Babina.

Comments (View)
permalink
I’ve been unfairly maligned about my jeans. The truth is, generally I look very sharp in jeans.
— President Barack Obama, in an interview here.  (via msnbc)
Comments (View)
Mar
14th
Fri
permalink
richkidsofinstagram:

All tied up. by giodaloja

richkidsofinstagram:

All tied up. by giodaloja

Comments (View)
Mar
5th
Wed
permalink

natashavc:

nicosan1:

IM F**KING DYING!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

A+ work here, everyone. 

(Source: yahooentertainment)

Comments (View)
Feb
17th
Mon
permalink

(Source: newyorker.com, via newyorker)

Comments (View)